Tag Archives: black history month

Today In Black History February 29

Today In Black History February 29 1892 – Sculptor and art instructor August Savage is born Augusta Christine Savage (1892-1962) was a renowned sculptor and teacher who also fought for the civil rights of African Americans. Despite a lifetime spent combatting the effects of racism and sexism, Augusta Savage’s accomplishments were many. She was a talented sculptor, an admired teacher, and a fighter for the rights of African Americans. Her circumstances were never easy, though she was afforded financial help and artistic encouragement from several Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 28

Today In Black History February 27   1776 – Phyllis Wheatley invited to President George Washington’s headquarters After her mistress, Mrs. Wheatley, died on October 18, 1773, Phillis was relieved of any domestic chores, but was not emancipated. In 1775, Phillis Wheatley published a poem celebrating George Washington, entitled, “To His Excellency, George Washington.” In 1776, Washington invited Wheatley to his home as thanks for the poem, and Thomas Paine republished the poem in the Pennsylvania Gazetteafter their meeting. Wheatley supported the American Revolution, but the war years saw Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 27

Today In Black History February 27 1833 – First African American woman to give public lectures Maria W. Steward is born In the spring of 1832, a free, young African American woman, Maria W. Miller Stewart, rose to address a Boston audience. During the next three years, Stewart made a total of four public addresses, published a political pamphlet and a collection of meditations, and then retired deliberately from the public stage, seemingly defeated by the obstacles arrayed against her as both an African American and a female Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 26

Today In Black History February 26 1870 – Wyatt Outlaw leader of Alamance County, NC Union League lynched On February 26, 1870, Wyatt Outlaw — a former slave and former Union soldier — was lynched by the Klan in Alamance County (where Outlaw was politically active). On May 21, 1870, state senator and Freedmen’s Bureau agent John W. Stephens — who had tried to organize the black population in Caswell County — was assisnated by the Klan at the county court house. Governor Holden used Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 25

Today In Black History February 25 1870 – Hiram Rhodes sworn in as first African American United States Senator One of the clearest signs that Reconstruction was changing the face of America came when Hiram Rhodes Revels was sworn-in as the new senator from Mississippi on Feb. 25, 1870, becoming the first African-American member of the U.S. Congress. Although his election received the strong support of Senate Republicans and members of the liberal press, conservative Southern Democrats tried to block Revels by referencing the notorious Dred Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 24

Today In Black History February 24   1811 – Bishop Daniel Payne is born Bishop Daniel A. Payne was born on February 24, 1811. He was a historian, educator and AME minister. He was born in Charleston, South Carolina to free colored parents, London and Martha Payne. He attended a private school in Charleston, South Carolina and Gettysburg Seminary in Pennsylvania. He also did a great deal of studying on his own. Payne was the first Bishop to have formal theological seminary training. He, more Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 23

Today In Black History February 23 1868 – W.E.B. Dubois is born William Edward Burghardt DuBois (African American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, and editor) was born on February 23, 1868 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. At that time Great Barrington had perhaps 25, but not more than 50, Black people out of a population of about 5,000. Consequently, there were little signs of overt racism there. Nevertheless, its venom was distributed through a constant barrage of suggestive innuendoes and vindictive attitudes of its residents. Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 22

Today In Black History February 22 1832 – Female Anti-Slavery Society of Salem formed In February 1832, a group of “females of color” in Salem, Massachusetts organized the first women’s antislavery society in the United States.  Like most free black antislavery societies, the Salem organization addressed a variety of issues important to free blacks in addition to the campaign against slavery.  It supported secular and Sabbath schools for free blacks, assisted newly freed or runaway slaves, and opposed racial segregation and discrimination in the northern Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 21

Today In Black History February 21 1936 – Barbara Jordan first black to give keynote address and national convention is born Barbara Jordan was born in the Fifth Ward of Houston, Texas to a Black Baptist minister, Benjamin Jordan, and a domestic worker, Arlyne Jordan. She attended Roberson Elementary and Phyllis Wheatley High School. While at Wheatley, she was a member of the Honor Society and excelled in debating. She graduated in 1952 in the upper five percent of her class. She wanted to study Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 20

Today In Black History February 20 1895 – Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, later known as Frederick Douglass dies in Washington, D.C. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, later known as Frederick Douglass. WASHINGTON, Feb. 20–Frederick Douglass dropped dead in the hallway of his residence on Anacostia Heights this evening at 7 o’clock. He had been in the highest spirits, and apparently in the best of health, despite his seventy-eight years, when death overtook him. This morning he was driven to Washington, accompanied by his wife. She left him Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 19

Today In Black History February 19 1919 - W.E.B. Dubois organized first Pan African Congress in Africa Racist treatment reinforced a sense of solidarity within the Diaspora. This found expression in a series of Pan-African meetings. In 1909 the first Pan African Conference was held. In 1919 the first of five Pan-African Congresses was held. This was organised by the African American thinker and journalist, W.E.B. DuBois. Fifty seven delegates attended representing fifteen countries. Its principal task was petitioning the Versailles Peace Conference, then meeting in Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 16

Today In Black History February 16   1857 – Frederick Douglass elected President of Freedman Bank and Trust The year 1874 was full of events for Douglass.  He was appointed President of Freedman’s Saving and Trust Company in DC but both the bank and his paper closed in the same year due to national economic trouble.  In 1877, Rutherford B. Hayes appointed him Marshall of DC, the first Senate confirmed position for a Black in America.  His wife died in 1882 and in 1884 he Continue reading →