Tag Archives: black history

This Is Not The Dream Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Had

I was perusing my news feeds on Facebook when I came across the above picture. I want to applaud Lawrence the Pictureman for creating this potent collage, because this is definitely not the dream Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had in mind. This image represents groups that will not make it to the Promise Land Dr. King described. Time is not promised to us, so the Village (Community) needs to come together and take care of the global family or the images above can become Continue reading →

Today in Black History March 6

Today in Black History March 6 Today’s information comes from BlackFacts.com 1. 1981 – City College President Dr. Bernard Harleston, former dean of arts and sciences at Tufts University, appointed president of New York’s City College. 2. 1957 – Ghana became an independent state March 6th, 1957, the Gold Coast gained it’s independence from Great Britain. Independence Square celebrations – Accra, Ghana Ghana – Political History Ghana lies at the heart of a region which has been leading sub-Saharan African culture since the first millennium Continue reading →

Today in Black History March 4

Today in Black History March 4 The following black history facts are courtesy of BlackFacts.com 1. 1968 – Poor People’s Campaign Martin Luther King, Jr. announced plans for Poor People’s Campaign in Washington. He said he would lead a massive civil disobedience campaign in the capital to pressure the government to provide jobs and income for all Americans. He told a press conference that an army of poor white, poor Blacks and Hispanics would … 2. 1932 – Miriam Makeba, Empress of African Song, born Continue reading →

Today in Black History March 3

Today in Black History March 3 1836 – Jefferson F. Long is born Jefferson Franklin Long, a Republican who represented Georgia in the 41st Congress, was the first black member to speak on the floor of the House of Representatives, and was the only black representative from Georgia for just over a century. Long was born a slave in Knoxville, Georgia on March 3, 1836. Little is known of his early years, however by the end of the civil war he had been educated and Continue reading →

Today in Black History: March 2

Today in Black History: March 2 1955 – Teenager Claudette Colvin arrested for bus sit in Claudette Colvin (b, September 5, 1939) is a African American woman from Alabama. In 1955, at the age of 15, she refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus to a white person, in violation of local law. Her arrest preceded civil rights activist Rosa Parks’ (on December 1, 1955) by nine months. At the time, Colvin was a student at Booker T. Washington High School. Colvin’s Continue reading →

Today in Black History: March 1

Today in Black History: March 1 1927 – Harry Belefonte is born Multi-talented performer, Harry Belafonte was born on March 1, 1927, in New York City. As a youth, he struggled with poverty and a turbulent family life. Belafonte’s career took off with the film Carmen Jones (1954). Soon after, he had several hits—”The Banana Boat Song (Day-O)” and “Jamaica Farewell.” In addition to his acting and singing career, Belafonte worked as a champion for many social and political causes. (read more) 1960 – 1000 March on Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 29

Today In Black History February 29 1892 – Sculptor and art instructor August Savage is born Augusta Christine Savage (1892-1962) was a renowned sculptor and teacher who also fought for the civil rights of African Americans. Despite a lifetime spent combatting the effects of racism and sexism, Augusta Savage’s accomplishments were many. She was a talented sculptor, an admired teacher, and a fighter for the rights of African Americans. Her circumstances were never easy, though she was afforded financial help and artistic encouragement from several Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 28

Today In Black History February 27   1776 – Phyllis Wheatley invited to President George Washington’s headquarters After her mistress, Mrs. Wheatley, died on October 18, 1773, Phillis was relieved of any domestic chores, but was not emancipated. In 1775, Phillis Wheatley published a poem celebrating George Washington, entitled, “To His Excellency, George Washington.” In 1776, Washington invited Wheatley to his home as thanks for the poem, and Thomas Paine republished the poem in the Pennsylvania Gazetteafter their meeting. Wheatley supported the American Revolution, but the war years saw Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 27

Today In Black History February 27 1833 – First African American woman to give public lectures Maria W. Steward is born In the spring of 1832, a free, young African American woman, Maria W. Miller Stewart, rose to address a Boston audience. During the next three years, Stewart made a total of four public addresses, published a political pamphlet and a collection of meditations, and then retired deliberately from the public stage, seemingly defeated by the obstacles arrayed against her as both an African American and a female Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 26

Today In Black History February 26 1870 – Wyatt Outlaw leader of Alamance County, NC Union League lynched On February 26, 1870, Wyatt Outlaw — a former slave and former Union soldier — was lynched by the Klan in Alamance County (where Outlaw was politically active). On May 21, 1870, state senator and Freedmen’s Bureau agent John W. Stephens — who had tried to organize the black population in Caswell County — was assisnated by the Klan at the county court house. Governor Holden used Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 25

Today In Black History February 25 1870 – Hiram Rhodes sworn in as first African American United States Senator One of the clearest signs that Reconstruction was changing the face of America came when Hiram Rhodes Revels was sworn-in as the new senator from Mississippi on Feb. 25, 1870, becoming the first African-American member of the U.S. Congress. Although his election received the strong support of Senate Republicans and members of the liberal press, conservative Southern Democrats tried to block Revels by referencing the notorious Dred Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 24

Today In Black History February 24   1811 – Bishop Daniel Payne is born Bishop Daniel A. Payne was born on February 24, 1811. He was a historian, educator and AME minister. He was born in Charleston, South Carolina to free colored parents, London and Martha Payne. He attended a private school in Charleston, South Carolina and Gettysburg Seminary in Pennsylvania. He also did a great deal of studying on his own. Payne was the first Bishop to have formal theological seminary training. He, more Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 23

Today In Black History February 23 1868 – W.E.B. Dubois is born William Edward Burghardt DuBois (African American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, and editor) was born on February 23, 1868 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. At that time Great Barrington had perhaps 25, but not more than 50, Black people out of a population of about 5,000. Consequently, there were little signs of overt racism there. Nevertheless, its venom was distributed through a constant barrage of suggestive innuendoes and vindictive attitudes of its residents. Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 22

Today In Black History February 22 1832 – Female Anti-Slavery Society of Salem formed In February 1832, a group of “females of color” in Salem, Massachusetts organized the first women’s antislavery society in the United States.  Like most free black antislavery societies, the Salem organization addressed a variety of issues important to free blacks in addition to the campaign against slavery.  It supported secular and Sabbath schools for free blacks, assisted newly freed or runaway slaves, and opposed racial segregation and discrimination in the northern Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 21

Today In Black History February 21 1936 – Barbara Jordan first black to give keynote address and national convention is born Barbara Jordan was born in the Fifth Ward of Houston, Texas to a Black Baptist minister, Benjamin Jordan, and a domestic worker, Arlyne Jordan. She attended Roberson Elementary and Phyllis Wheatley High School. While at Wheatley, she was a member of the Honor Society and excelled in debating. She graduated in 1952 in the upper five percent of her class. She wanted to study Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 20

Today In Black History February 20 1895 – Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, later known as Frederick Douglass dies in Washington, D.C. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, later known as Frederick Douglass. WASHINGTON, Feb. 20–Frederick Douglass dropped dead in the hallway of his residence on Anacostia Heights this evening at 7 o’clock. He had been in the highest spirits, and apparently in the best of health, despite his seventy-eight years, when death overtook him. This morning he was driven to Washington, accompanied by his wife. She left him Continue reading →

Pictures of My Impromptu visit to the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C.

I’ve seen several images on the internet of the memorial dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. , however I’ve never had the chance to see the statue in person. Last night I got that chance with an  impromptu trip to Washington, D.C. (Saturday, February 19, 2012). Technology in regards to camera phones is amazing to me. I took the following images at night with my HTC Evo Shift camera phone. I definitely plan to go back to the memorial when it is light out to be Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 19

Today In Black History February 19 1919 - W.E.B. Dubois organized first Pan African Congress in Africa Racist treatment reinforced a sense of solidarity within the Diaspora. This found expression in a series of Pan-African meetings. In 1909 the first Pan African Conference was held. In 1919 the first of five Pan-African Congresses was held. This was organised by the African American thinker and journalist, W.E.B. DuBois. Fifty seven delegates attended representing fifteen countries. Its principal task was petitioning the Versailles Peace Conference, then meeting in Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 18

Today In Black History February 18 1688 – Quakers of Germantown, Pennsylvania passed the first formal anti-slavery resolution The history of the movement to abolish slavery is virtually coeval with the establishment of racial slavery in the New World. In the Western Hemisphere, millions of enslaved Africans were embedded in the workforces of all of the Americas and the Caribbean Islands from 1502 to 1888. Unlike slavery elsewhere in the modern world, these societies had economies dependent on chattel slavery or the labor of individuals Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 17

Today In Black History February 17 1918 - Charles Arthur Hayes is born in Cairo (Representative, 1983–1993, Democrat from Illinois) Born in Cairo, Illinois, on February 17, 1918, Charles Arthur Hayes graduated from Cairo’s Sumner High School in 1935. After high school, Hayes worked in Cairo as a machine operator. His long career of union activism began when he helped organize Local 1424 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Hayes served as president of this organization from 1940 to 1942. In Continue reading →

Today In Black History February 16

Today In Black History February 16   1857 – Frederick Douglass elected President of Freedman Bank and Trust The year 1874 was full of events for Douglass.  He was appointed President of Freedman’s Saving and Trust Company in DC but both the bank and his paper closed in the same year due to national economic trouble.  In 1877, Rutherford B. Hayes appointed him Marshall of DC, the first Senate confirmed position for a Black in America.  His wife died in 1882 and in 1884 he Continue reading →

Today in Black History February 15

Today in Black History February 14 1. 1804 – New Jersey begins to abolish slavery In 1804 the New Jersey Legislature passed “An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery.” It provided that females born of slave parents after July 4, 1804, would be free upon reaching 21 years of age, and males upon reaching 25. Like New York’s, this law held a hidden subsidy for slaveowners. A provision allowed them to free their slave children, who would then be turned over to the care Continue reading →

Today in Black History February 14

Today in Black History February 14 1. 1818 - Frederick Douglass is born The son of a slave woman and an unknown white man, “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey” was born in February of 1818 on Maryland’s eastern shore. He spent his early years with his grandparents and with an aunt, seeing his mother only four or five times before her death when he was seven. (All Douglass knew of his father was that he was white.) During this time he was exposed to the degradations Continue reading →

Today In Black History: February 13

Today In Black History: February 13 1. 1818 – Founder of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, Absalom Jones dies Absalom Jones was born into slavery in Sussex County, Delaware, on November 6, 1746. He taught himself to read and knew the New Testament thoroughly at an early age. When he was 16, Absalom’s owner took him to Philadelphia, Pa., where he served as a clerk and handyman in a retail store. (read more)   2. 1882 – Henry Highland Garnet dies Henry Highland Garnet — born Continue reading →

Today In Black History: February 12

Today In Black History: February 12 1793 - Congress enacted the first fugitive slave law On this day, Congress passes the first fugitive slave law, requiring all states, including those that forbid slavery, to forcibly return slaves who have escaped from other states to their original owners. The laws stated that “no person held to service of labor in one state, under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such labor or service or Continue reading →